8 Key Metals Used In Metal Casting

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Metal casting is a highly versatile method for manufacturing complex geometries and high-performance components.


You can determine the quality and durability of your metal cast component by choosing the right metal for your component. Read on to find out which metal is the best for your manufacturing requirements and learn more about the most commonly used metals for metal casting.


What Is Metal?

The answer is fairly straightforward with no knowledge of chemistry needed. The following four metal properties describe anything that's a metal. Metals:

Shiny (unless they're dirty or rusted)

Conduct electricity and heat 

Are variously malleable, allowing them to bend without breaking

Can be mixed, producing alloys with various properties 

Throughout this article, we’ll examine some of the commonly used metals in metal casting and machining. Each casting design may have different requirements. Some require as high strength, whilst others require as much weight as possible.

Knowing your options before purchasing cast parts is important since one metal, used successfully in a past design, may not be the right choice for another. Depending on the material you choose, the metal casting supplier can work with you further to select the right casting material.

The 8 most commonly used metals in manufacturing today are listed below to help you get started.


Gray Iron

White Iron

Ductile Iron

Stainless Steel

Carbon Steel

Copper-Based Alloy

Nickel-Based Alloy

Aluminum Alloy


Gray Iron

It is possible to achieve different levels of machinability and strength depending on the class of gray iron. Softer, more machinable iron can have tensile strengths that are less than 20,000 psi, while harder, less machinable iron can have tensile strengths that are triple that of 20,000 psi.

White Iron

In addition to its wear resistance, white iron can also be alloyed with higher levels of chromium or other metals to increase its performance at high temperatures or protect it from corrosion.

Ductile Iron

There is a wide range of strengths available in ductile iron, and it can serve a variety of purposes due to its higher tensile strength than gray iron.

Stainless Steel

Best known for its corrosion resistance, stainless steel also provides a high level of toughness. Steels with a chromium content of 10.5% or higher are classified as stainless steel. By increasing the amounts of chromium and molybdenum in stainless steel, higher levels of corrosion resistance can be achieved.

Carbon steel is enriched with metals like manganese, nickel, molybdenum, silicon, vanadium, chromium, boron, and titanium. The general trend with alloy steels is to improve tensile strength, hardness, and wear resistance, but at the cost of weldability and toughness.

Copper-Based Alloy

There is a high level of corrosion resistance in copper-based alloys, making them a good choice for long-term cost savings. In addition, the properties are determined by other elements in the final product. Copper-based alloys include brass, which is made up of copper and zinc, as well as bronze, which is composed of copper, tin, and/or lead.

Nickel-Based Alloy

Nickel-based alloys display excellent corrosion resistance. Nickel can be combined with copper, chrome, zinc, iron, and manganese to achieve different properties. In chemical handling equipment, alloys containing a high nickel content are often used as they have the tensile strength of carbon steel, but also have good ductility and wear resistance.

Aluminium

As well as its excellent machinability, aluminum is also highly corrosion resistant. These properties make it suitable for use in a wide range of applications. Aluminum alloy is also very castable, which makes it an ideal choice for die casting.

A comparison of metals

In the following chart, we compare the corrosion resistance, machinability, price, tensile strength, hardness, weldability, wear resistance, and toughness of different alloys.
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